Does Walking Reduce Blood Pressure?

If you’ve heard any of the announcements from the various health authorities and heart associations around the world, you’ll be familiar with the refrain that exercise is good for your blood pressure.

But doesn’t that mean hard, sweaty, panting exercise? Does walking reduce blood pressure? Well, pumping it at a gym or jumping around at aerobics class can be great for fitness and lowering blood pressure. However, just going for a brisk walk, even a short one can really help lower high blood pressure. Read on for more details.

 

Does walking reduce blood pressure?

Well, actually, initially no! Doing any exercise slightly raises your blood pressure when you start doing it, including walking. However, walking regularly has a definite and proven effect of lowering blood pressure over the longer term. So, while one walk won’t make much difference, walking frequently will.

In fact, studies show that going for a well-paced walk most days can lower high blood pressure by up to 8/6 points (systolic/diastolic). does walking reduce blood pressure - yes

So does walking reduce blood pressure? Yes.

 

How does walking decrease blood pressure?

Walking decreases blood pressure in quite a few different ways.

Firstly, walking briskly gets your heart working harder which gradually makes it stronger and more efficient at pumping blood through your body, which means it can pump more blood with less force, resulting in lower blood pressure.

Walking reduces blood pressure also by improving the condition of your blood vessels. Plus, regular exercise like walking can lower blood pressure by improving the way your body processes sugar and fat, resulting in healthier cholesterol levels and better control of your blood sugar levels (which is crucial in lowering high blood pressure – see this post on sugar and blood pressure).

Connected with this, frequently walking will help you keep your weight under control, which is also instrumental in lowering high blood pressure.

All these benefits of walking for blood pressure feed back into each other, and also improve your general health, reducing your risk of heart disease and diabetes (amongst other things).

So these are some ways in which walking lowers blood pressure directly.

However, walking affects blood pressure indirectly too, through its effect on your mind and mood.

 

Other ways in which walking lowers blood pressure

Mood enhancement

Ever heard of the ‘high’ that athletes experience? This is due to exercise stimulating your body to produce certain brain chemicals, such as serotonin and endorphins, which make you feel gooooood. The good news is that you don’t have to run marathons to get their benefits. Going for a walk can boost your mood – not just while your walking but for a few hours afterwards, and walking regularly can increase your serotonin levels in the long-term too.

So how does that help lower blood pressure? Well, to put it simply, a better state of mind is associated with better blood pressure. Chronic anxiety and depression are associated with a greater tendency to develop high blood pressure (and anti-depressant drugs might also be a factor) and stress is well-known to be a major cause of high blood pressure for many people.

Stress reduction

As well as keeping you more cheerful, regular walking can also improve your ability to deal with stress. This is because regular exercise fortifies your body and builds up your resilience to stress and, for most of us, lower stress levels means lower blood pressure.

These effects of walking for blood pressure reduction are the general mental effects of exercise – walking or cycling or whatever. But walking specifically is good for stress and clearing your mind. The regular paced motion has a calming effect on the mind and also gets things moving mentally and emotionally as well as physically.

Next time you’ve got a mental block on something or are feeling lethargic, go out for a short walk and see if you don’t find your ideas shifting and your mood lifting… and your blood pressure slowly going down….

 

Walking versus other forms of exercise for reducing blood pressure

Walking isn’t necessarily better than other forms of exercise for reducing blood pressure, like cycling or yoga or aerobics or tennis or dance…. However, one things about walking is that it’s simple, it’s free and it’s accessible.

As a Surgeon General of the US once said, “Walking is the biggest bang for our buck. Thirty minutes a day of walking will prevent many cases of diabetes, hypertension, and other chronic diseases. Walking is the simplest, easiest way for most people.”

 

Walking and blood pressure reduction: how to do it

So that’s all well and good. You know how walking lowers blood pressure, but how do you go about it? How much do you have to walk? How far? How fast?

Well, the more you can walk, the better for your blood pressure (as long as you’re not overdoing it). But what’s the minimum you can walk and still see blood pressure benefits?

How often?

As with any exercise for lower blood pressure, health authorities generally recommend at least half an hour a day for at least five days of the week. But research has shown that you can get the same benefits by breaking this up into smaller chunks – so three ten minute walks most days would do it.

How fast?

As for the pace, you do want to get your heart and lungs working harder – this is vital – so crawling along is not going to do it for most people. A a good guideline is to attempt or imagine having a conversation while you walk. If you can speak easily and at length while you’re walking, then you need to step it up a bit. However if you’re really struggling for breath and words then maybe you’re pushing a little too hard. If you can exchange short phrases with someone then that’s about right.

Assess yourself

Obviously you need to be able to judge for yourself what’s enough and what is too much. If you’re very inactive, then a very slow stroll might be plenty to start with. If you’re very fit, then an invigorating brisk walk is required. And while it’s good to get into a steady pace (for maximum physical and mental benefits), you can work up to this gradually – start slowly and gently then move faster once you’re warmed up. Stretch a bit before and after too, if it helps.

 

How to fit walking for lower blood pressure into your day

Being motivated enough to get out for a walk is one thing, but what if you’re struggling to find the time? One of the advantages of walking to reduce blood pressure is that it’s such a versatile activity.

Everyone’s day’s different but here are a few suggestions of opportunities to get walking to reduce blood pressure – times when you’ll get the maximum mental and physical benefits:

  • morning – try getting out for a quick walk first thing before or after breakfast to get your blood and brain moving for the day ahead
  • lunchtime – go for a short walk before or after you have your lunch – it’ll help clear your head and refresh you
  • mid-morning and mid-afternoon –  these are times when we can often feel drowsy or lethargic, so a little walk then can help to re-energise you
  • after work / before your evening meal – walking home from work, or walking after work, is a great way to literally leave the day’s stresses behind; or if you spend your day at home, get out for a walk to refresh yourself

Instead, or as well, you can incorporate walking into the things you do already. So walk whenever possible during the things you do every day or adjust your daily routine slightly in order to include some walking. For example:

  • walk to the shops to get your groceries – if you usually drive to a big store, then see if there’s a local store near you that you can walk to to pick up your everday messages, milk, bread, the papers
  • walk to and from work – or if it’s too far to walk the whole way, then drive only part of the way; or if you get public transport, get on or off a stop or two early
  • park your car in the furthest corner of the parking lot from wherever you’re going
  • take the stairs not escalators or elevators
  • if it’s terrible weather, then walk around inside – a local museum or even a shopping mall
  • and if you already walk places, take the ‘scenic route’ – walk a longer way round and maybe discover something interesting along the way…

 

How walking reduces blood pressure – and what else you can do

As well as walking, there are myriad other activities that’ll help you get your blood pressure down to safe and healthy levels. And there are many many things you can eat and drink that’ll make a big difference too.

We’ve now compiled all our research and experience with lowering blood pressure into an easy-follow guide:

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

As the title suggests, there are nine steps, which you can follow at your own pace, and which give clear guidance on different aspects of lowering blood pressure naturally.walking and high blood pressure

There are more tips on walking and blood pressure, as well as other kinds of exercise (including a kind that doesn’t involve even leaving the sofa), plus plenty of tips and recipes on food and drink, and a host of techniques to de-stress.

This step-by-step approach is designed to ensure your blood pressure gets lower and stays lower.

The guide is also designed to help you live a healthier and happier life. Lowering your blood pressure doesn’t have to be about denial. There are more than enough tasty foods, refreshing drinks, enjoyable activities and relaxing practices which reduce your blood pressure – and they’re covered here.

Just click on the pic for more information and/or to download a free sample.

 

 

How to Do Hand Grip Exercises to Lower Blood Pressure

how to do hand grip exercises to lower blood pressureThere are several studies which now show that doing simple hand grip exercises can lower blood pressure. However, doing any old hand gripping exercises won’t necessarily work. You have to do them in a certain way for them to be effective in lower your blood pressure. So the question is how to do hand grip exercises to lower blood pressure?

 

Hand grip exercise devices

To do handgrip devices, you’ll need something to grip.

There’s a device developed specifically for doing hand grip exercises to lower blood pressure called the Zona Plus. It’s an excellent device and makes it easy to do hand grip exercises correctly and effectively.

However, Zona Plus is not cheap at $399 to $599, depending on the model.

To save a bundle you could use simple handgripper devices. These devices are designed to be used for building hand grip strength. However, you can use them to do blood pressure-lowering hand grip exercises instead.

You can even just use a squeezable ball.

I’ve reviewed and compared these different devices in another post. So click here if you want more information and links to order online: handgrip exercises for lower blood pressure (scroll down a bit to see the device reviews)

So find yourself something to grip and then follow the guidelines below to get started.

 

How to do hand grip exercises to lower blood pressure

 

1. Establish the correct grip strength

The main thing to keep in mind when doing hand grip exercises to lower blood pressure is that you don’t need to grip at your full strength. In fact gripping something too tightly for too long is just going to raise your blood pressure more.

So make sure whatever device you’re using isn’t too hard for you to squeeze. You don’t want to be forcing yourself into gripping too tightly. If you’re using handgrippers, then go for low- or moderate-resistance models.

You’re aiming to be gripping your device at about 30% of your full strength.

A good way to gauge this is to grip your device as hard as you can briefly, then try gripping it again at about a third of this intensity. This is the trickiest part of doing hand grip exercises to lower blood pressure. (It’s also the one part where the Zona Plus does have a clear advantage in that it can calibrate itself to your grip and tell you when you’re gripping at 30%).

Check your grip strength each time

You can do this grip check each time you start a set of hand grip exercises. Your grip-strength might vary slightly from day to day, or even through the day, depending on your energy levels or how you’ve been using your hands or various other factors. So establish this 30% grip at the start of each session. Then pay close attention throughout to make sure you’re keeping that level of grip.

If you decide to do the exercises with alternating hands (see below), then you need to gauge the 30% grip strength separately for each hand.

 

2. Follow the recommended schedule of grip and rest periods

Now you can get on with doing the exercises. If you’re using the Zona Plus, then it will guide you through the exercises.

If you’re using another device or object, the American Heart Association recommend following the protocols of the published studies on handgrip exercises for lower blood pressure.

The format used in most handgrip exercise studies is as follows:

  • squeeze/grip your chosen object for 2 minutes at a time, at about a third of your full strength
  • rest for a few minutes (most studies used 1 or 3 minute rest periods)
  • repeat this cycle 3 more times (for a total of 4 cycles)  – this works out to about 15 minutes for one session
  • do a session like this 3 or 4 days a week.

Zona Plus instructions follow the same format (using 1 minute rest periods), however, Zona Plus recommends you do one session at least 5 days a week.

Some research suggests alternating hands for each cycle is best. This is also what the Zona Plus manufacturer recommends. This would mean 2 cycles per hand in total. (In other words, grip for 2 minutes with your right hand, rest, grip for 2 minutes with your left hand, rest, repeat).

Remember to maintain a constant grip strength during the squeezing period. It’s easy to start squeezing harder without realizing or for your grip to soften a bit over time, so try to keep an eye on this.

Build up to it gradually if necessary

At first it can be quite hard to maintain a grip for two minutes even at just a third of your full strength. You can work up to it gradually though. For example, start by gripping for periods of, say, 10 seconds at a time and do a session with these short grip periods. Increase the gripping period each day until you can do it for the full two minutes each time.

 

3. Keep doing them!

You need to do these hand grip exercises regularly to see any blood pressure-lowering effects. Do them at least 3 – 5 times a week.

Even them, it can take a couple of months of regularly doing the hand grip exercises to see a reduction in your blood pressure. And the benefits only continue as long as you are doing the hand grip exercises. So once you’ve started, don’t stop!

 

Are hand grip exercises safe for me to do?

For most people hand grip exercises are perfectly safe. There are a couple of exceptions though.

Firstly, if you have any trouble using your hands then hand grip exercises might be too difficult for you. For example, if you have arthritis or carpal tunnel syndrome then you might struggle.

Secondly, if your blood pressure is very high then hand grip exercises may not be a good idea. This is because hand grip exercises work to reduce your resting blood pressure – i.e., your blood pressure when you’re not exercising. However, while you are doing hand grip exercises you often get a temporary spike in blood pressure. Once you’re finished the exercises this spike usually disappears within a few minutes. But if your blood pressure is very high this may be a little risky.

The American Heart Association recommends that “isometric exercise should be avoided among individuals with BP levels >180/110 mm Hg until their hypertension is better controlled.” (Hypertension journal, April 2013.) Be sure to speak to your doctor before doing hand grip exercises if you’re not sure if they’re safe for you.

Can hand grip exercises lower my blood pressure enough?

Studies suggest that if you do hand grip exercises accurately, then doing them regularly can make a noticeable difference to your blood pressure. However, they may not lower your blood pressure enough, depending on how your body responds and on how high your blood pressure is in the first place.

Lowering your blood pressure naturally to a significant degree usually depends on taking a broad approach. So, as well as doing hand grip exercises, you can use other methods to reduce your blood pressure. You can adjust some of the things you eat and drink. You can ractise techniques to relax more. And you can (literally) take steps to be more active.

You’ll find a thorough overview of all the ways you can lower your blood pressure naturally in our book: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

lower your blood pressure naturallySince there are so many things you can do to lower your blood pressure naturally, the problem often is knowing where to start.

To keep it simple, our guide outlines the various options in a straightforward way, and walks you through them in an easy-to-follow step-by-step manner.

Each step deals with different things you can do to lower your blood pressure:

  • the foods and drinks to get more of or avoid
  • how you can be more active in your day to day life
  • how to handle your stress levels and enjoy a more relaxing life

The guide also puts a strong emphasis on how to introduce beneficial changes to your life in a way that works for you. Then you can lower your blood pressure naturally and enjoy the process 🙂

Just click on the pic for more information and a free sample chapter.

 

Post by Alison (Photo credit: bottled_void from flickr.com)

Key reference:

Beyond Medications and Diet: Alternative Approaches to Lowering Blood Pressure – A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, Hypertension, April 2013

https://hyper.ahajournals.org/content/61/6/1360.long



Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally: Step 5

natural ways to lower blood pressure

This page is a companion to Step 5 of our book – Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide – out now for just $27 (£17)

 

Active Health and Happiness

Exercise

WEIGHT AND BLOOD PRESSURE

Body Mass Index (BMI)

You can calculate your BMI online here:

US National Institutes of Health BMI calculator

Abdominal Fat

This article describes why belly fat can cause health problems:
Web MD The Risks of Belly Fat

 

SMOKING AND BLOOD PRESSURE

The Preach Free Guide to Smoking and Quitting is the best resource for quitting smoking in our opinion, so have a look at that if you haven’t already.

NOTE: The Preach Free Guide to Smoking and Quitting comes as a free bonus with our book, Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide. If you haven’t yet got the guide, click here.

Good resources for quitting smoking can also be found here:

Quit Smoking Community – recommended by a reader – a US organization “which helps people quit smoking and advocates for healthy, smoke-free public spaces and towns”

Quitting Smoking (US Government Health Website)

 

Aerobic / Cardio Exercise

Some resources you might find helpful to monitor and guide your progress when exercising:

Calculating Heart Rate

American Heart Association article on how to measure your heart rate and how to use it to assess and manage your exercise activities:

AHA – Heart Rate Assessment

Track Your Progress

The British Heart Foundation publishes a good activity diary, and a progress tracker, which you can download or print out from their website:

BHA activity diary

BHA progress tracker

Stretches before activity

The American Heart Association has a good illustrated guide to stretches for walking, which you can view or download:

AHA stretches for walking

 

Isometric handgrip exercises

The Zona Plus

Detailed information about the Zona Plus can be found on our post:
Zona Plus review

Other devices for doing handgrip exercises

There are various other, cheaper, things you can use to do isometric handgrip exercises (following the instructions in Step 5 of the guide). Here are a few suggestions:

A good squeezeball, recommended for IHG exercises by one of our mailing list members who found it very effective:

IronMind EGG squeezeball (blue) – $25.95 (Amazon.com)

You can also use hand-grippers. These come in different resistances – some are more difficult to squeeze than others – so pick one appropriate for your strength level. But remember, you only want to be squeezing at about a third of your full grip strength so you don’t need to be crunching something super-strong:

ZoN Handgrips- about $8 (Amazon.com)

Reviews say the ZoN handgrips are quite easy to squeeze, so could be good to start with but if you need something stronger, you can always try these Captains of Crush ones (available in various resistances):

Captains of Crush handgrippers – $22.95 – $55 (Amazon.com)

 

If there are other websites, resources or products you’ve found useful and you think would be useful to others, please email them to us and we’ll include them:
admin@highbloodpressurebegone.com

 

NOTE: We’ve supplied Amazon links to those products that may be a little trickier to find, as Amazon is popular and convenient to use. However, Amazon aren’t known to be the most ethical company (we do not endorse them ourselves) so we recommend buying your healthy products in your local shops if you can!

 

 

Handgrip Exercises for Lower Blood Pressure

handgrip exercises for lower blood pressureYou probably know that regular aerobic/cardio exercise is important for reducing high blood pressure.

Aerobic exercise is activity that gets your heart and lungs working harder, and it can be anything from walking to swimming, to raking up leaves or cleaning the floor.

But did you know you can also lower your blood pressure by just sitting around squeezing something for quarter of an hour a day?

Doing handgrip exercises for lower blood pressure could be the easiest way to lower your blood pressure that’s been discovered….

 

Isometric handgrip exercise

Isometric exercise involves using muscular force, but without movement, and some forms of isometric exercise have been found to have surprising benefits for blood pressure.

The main type studied is isometric handgrip exercise which basically involves gripping something with your hand, to contract the muscles in your arm, but without moving your arm itself.

This might not sound like much but it turns out that doing it regularly can lower your blood pressure over time.

This was discovered by accident in the 1970s, by a scientist working with US fighter pilots to help them deal with high G-forces when flying. He developed a device that they could squeeze with their hands, to temporarily raise their blood pressure just enough to stop them blacking out.

It worked, but then they found it had a great side-effect – it had lowered the blood pressure of those pilots who’d had high blood pressure (and who were doing this hand-squeezing exercise regularly).

*a range of devices for doing handgrip exercises for lower blood pressure are outlined below*

 

Benefits of handgrip exercises for lower blood pressure

Many studies have been done since then on the effects of doing isometric handgrip exercises for lower blood pressure, and a report published by the American Heart Association in April 2013 concluded that such handgrip exercises produce “significant reductions” in blood pressure.

In fact, recent reviews of isometric handgrip exercise studies show drops in blood pressure of 10%. It’s not completely clear to medical researchers how handgrip exercises lower blood pressure, but research suggests it works in at least three ways:

  • it balances your autonomic nervous system – which regulates all the things you don’t have to think about, including blood pressure
  • it improves the condition of your blood vessels, repairing any damage
  • it encourages your blood vessels to dilate, allowing freer blood flow

Isometric handgrip exercise affects blood pressure in a different way to aerobic exercise so it’s worth doing, even if you’re getting plenty aerobic exercise. Also, this handgrip exercise on its own has been shown to be effective at lowering blood pressure, so if you’re not able to be more active, it’s a great way to improve your blood pressure.

A big advantage of doing handgrip exercises for lower blood pressure is that it doesn’t take a lot of time. You only need to do it for about 12 minutes a day, several times a week, and you can do it pretty much anywhere – standing up, sitting down, watching TV….so it’s a small commitment for potentially impressive results.

Mind you, the effects take some time to manifest – it may take a month or two. So you need to keep doing it – you’ll continue to feel the benefits as long as you continue to do the exercises.

 

How to do handgrip exercises for lower blood pressure

Isometric handgrip exercises for lower blood pressure are pretty straightforward. They basically consist of squeezing or gripping something for 2 minutes at a time, at about a third of your full grip-strength, and doing this several times.

Click here for detailed instructions on how to do hand grip exercises to lower blood pressure

You need something to squeeze though, and there are a range of different devices that you can use for doing handgrip exercises, ranging from the very cheap to the very expensive.

 

Handgrip devices for lowering blood pressure

The Zona Plus

The Zona Plus (formerly called ‘CardioGrip’) is a more sophisticated version of the device originally used with the fighter pilots, and was developed by the same scientific team to focus specifically on lowering blood pressure.

It’s a portable computerised handheld device, with a screen which gives you instructions on how to do the handgrip exercises.

The advantage of the Zona Plus is that it calibrates itself to your grip strength, and then guides you through a series of squeezes, at exactly the right effort-level for you to get the maximum benefits for your blood pressure.

The disadvantage is that even the cheapest model costs $399 (about £300 or €355)!

Click here for our Zona Plus review.

Other handgrip exercise devices

handgrippersYou can do handgrip exercises using ordinary hand-grip strengtheners. These are usually in the form of spring-loaded handles which you have to squeeze together. You can also use a squeezy de-stress-ball, or any rubber ball really.

Here’s a sample of devices you can buy online which you can use to do IHG exercises:

ZoN handgrips – about $8
Reviews say they are quite easy to squeeze – so could be good to start with. Remember, you only need to be gripping something at a third of your full strength so you don’t want a device that’s too difficult for you to squeeze.

Captains of Crush handgrippers (different strengths) – $22.95 – $55
If you need something stronger, you can always try these…

IronMind EGG squeezeball – $25.95
Recommended for IHG exercises by a mailing list member!

 

Zona Plus vs. other devices

So: is it necessary – or best – to buy the Zona Plus? Or is it good enough to use something less expensive?

Advantages of the Zona Plus

The effectiveness of using the Zona Plus is well-documented

Many of the clinical studies showing the effectiveness of IHG exercise for lowering blood pressure have used the Zona Plus device. According to the makers of the Zona Plus, since it became commercially available, tens of thousands of people have used it, and 9 out of 10 users have lower blood pressure after 6-8 weeks of using it.

The Zona Plus is approved by the US FDA for improving cardiovascular health, and in the European Union and Canada it’s also officially endorsed as a clinically proven treatment for high blood pressure.

It’s easier to do handgrip exercises accurately using the Zona Plus

When doing handgrip exercises using other devices, it may be quite tricky to accurately gauge whether you’re gripping at 30% of your maximum grip, which is what’s recommended to give you the desired effects.

However, because the Zona Plus calibrates itself to your grip strength each time you use it, it guides you to grip at exactly the right strength to give you exactly the most effective intensity of exercise – enough to trigger the blood-pressure-reducing-effects but not too much strain on your body.

According to the Zona Plus manufacturers, it’s quite a narrow window between what’s not enough and what’s too much, so they say you can’t get the same effects by just squeezing a ball or handgripper….

The level of effort set by the Zona Plus is also designed to minimise the temporary blood pressure spike you get when doing IHG exercise.

Advantages of other devices

The main advantage of using other devices for handgrip exercise is that they cost a lot less. You can get squeezy stress ball or hand-grippers for under $30, or you can even just buy a cheap rubber ball from the Dollar Store or Pound Shop.

Some blood pressure sufferers have reported good results using these cheaper devices, on various internet forums and review websites. And at least one clinical study demonstrated a significant blood pressure-reducing effect using an inexpensive spring-loaded handgrip strengthener.

Whatever you try, remember that it can take up to a couple of months (occasionally longer) to really see the effects, so you have to stick with it and do the exercises regularly for them to work.

 

Safety of handgrip exercises

Handgrip exercises are safe to do for pretty much everyone. The main exceptions are if you have problems with your hands, like arthritis, or carpal tunnel syndrome, in which case you might find it too difficult to squeeze effectively.

The other exception may be if you have very high blood pressure. This is because handgrip exercise works to reduce your resting blood pressure – i.e., your blood pressure when you’re not exercising. However, you often get a temporary spike in blood pressure whilst doing the exercises. This usually resolves itself within a few minutes, but if your blood pressure is very high, this may be a little risky.

The American Heart Association recommends that “isometric exercise should be avoided among individuals with BP levels >180/110 mm Hg until their hypertension is better controlled.” (Hypertension journal, April 2013) If you have any concerns regarding the suitability of handgrip exercises for yourself, speak to your doctor before starting.

 

Will doing handgrip exercises be enough to lower my blood pressure?

Hand grip exercises don’t seem to work for everyone to lower blood pressure, but research suggests they do work for most. So there’s a good chance that doing handgrip exercises regularly can make a difference to your blood pressure. However, even so, they may or may not lower it enough. Everyone’s different, so give it a try.

However, if you find you need to get your blood pressure down further, don’t worry – there are a lot of other things you can do, such as eating more or less of certain things, being more active, practising relaxation techniques and getting a handle on any stress.

In fact, for lowering blood pressure naturally, it’s generally most effective to take a broad approach, so that everything works together to contribute to getting your body, and your blood pressure, into a healthier balance.

So where do you start? Well, to make it simple, we’ve put together an easy-to-follow guide:

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

As the title suggests, the guide is laid out into nine clear steps. Each step deals with different things you can do to lower your blood pressure:

  • the foods and drinks you need to get more of or avoid
  • how you can be more active in your day to day life without having to get into lycra and go to the gym (unless you want to, of course)
  • how to handle your stress levels and enjoy a more relaxing life

lower your blood pressure naturallyEach step sets out straightforward aims and action plans so that you know what to do and how to do it. And you can take each step at whatever pace suits you – making simple changes to your diet and daily routine as you go.

Perhaps most importantly, the guide shows you how to incorporate these changes into your life simply and easily – and enjoyably!

Lowering your blood pressure naturally doesn’t have to be difficult. And it’s difficult not to enjoy feeling healthier and happier and more relaxed!

Just click on the pic for more information (and you can also get a free sample to check out).



Diet and Exercise to lower blood pressure

How I lowered blood pressure without drugs

It’s been just over 5 months since I dispensed with high blood pressure medications (that weren’t working and had unpleasant side effects) and began exploring alternative cures.

Yesterday was a big milestone. For the first time ever my blood pressure was monitored below the much slated ideal of 120/80. After doing a slow breathing exercise for 15 minutes it came in as 116/79.

Of course I was suspicious at first as because my blood pressure is usually in the 125-135 / 85-95 range. Given that my parents both suffered from high blood pressure and my higher blood pressure is most likely ‘in the genes’. So I figured that’s about as good as it’ll get for me. So I took the reading again at it this time it came in at 111/ 76 – amazing!

Amazing when you consider I was consistently 190+/120+ only five months before, plagued by headaches, heart palpitations, and the end of my life seemed to be approaching rapidly. You could say I’ve come a long way.

So what’s the secret to my new found health and ‘normal’ blood pressure? Two things – Diet and Exercise.

diet and exercise for lower blood pressure

 

Diet and Exercise to Lower Blood Pressure

Exercise includes:

  1. A 30 minute walk up the hill behind my house that gets my lungs and heart working two or three times a week
  2. Taking 15 minutes off for a slow breathing exercise (assisted by guided slow breathing audio tracks)

Diet includes:

  1. Drinking water more often (I prefer it carbonated)
  2. Having a bowl of oatmeal every morning
  3. Supplementing my daily diet with 500mg Vitamin C, multi vitamin (including 100mg Magnesium), 600mg Calcium, Cod Liver Oil capsules (Omega 3), 30 drops of Hawthorn tincture
  4. Virtually eliminating processed foods and just sticking with the basics
  5. Apples, bananas, celery, onions, garlic, tomatoes, (among other things of course)
  6. Cayenne powder, apple cider vinegar, and only the best extra vigin olive oil
  7. Reduction in the amount of salt I consume – I now use the Celtic Sea Salt (Sel de Gurerande) naturally harvested from the coast of Brittanny, France (as they have done it for centuries)
  8. Less red meat, more chicken and fish
  9. Red wine and dark chocolate everyday
  10. … and more nuts.

In a nutshell that’s about it. I now live a much healthier, relaxed and trouble-free life with optimal blood pressure as well. It’s more than I would have imagined 5 months ago but now there’s no turning back. My final curtains have receded well off into the distant future.

 

How to lower your blood pressure naturally – the book!

How did I know what to do and eat to lower my dangerously high blood pressure? I did a lot of research and reading, including Get Natural! by Kevin Riley, the best step-by-step guide to lowering blood pressure naturally.

Well that’s what has worked for me. Please leave a comment and tell us what’s worked for you.

UPDATE: Kevin Riley’s guide is no longer available, so my partner and I have researched and written our own guide – Lowering Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide.

lower your blood pressure naturallyThe guide contains simple and proven strategies for lowering your blood pressure and keeping it low through easy, effective and enjoyable changes in lifestyle.

These progressive steps are based on the principle that positive incremental change is always best in health matters.

Each chapter will take you further along the road of greater vigour and peace of mind (and a healthy blood pressure).

Click on the picture for more information.

 

P.S. This guide shows you how to lower your blood pressure permanently and naturally without side-effects or complications.

Follow each step to get your blood pressure back in balance.

Choose between a wide range of delicious foods that reduce your blood pressure. Include a number of mental and physical exercises in your schedule for both relaxation and invigoration.

Following this guide will reduce, and in time, eliminate your need for blood pressure lowering medications.

This is a guide for good healthy living and will be beneficial for all – even if you don’t currently suffer from high blood pressure.

To download a sample of the guide to your computer right now click here and scroll to the bottom of the page for the download link.

 

Exercise and High Blood Pressure

Physical exercise is so important for your general state of well being as well as your blood pressure. There are really no substitutes for getting out there and getting your muscles moving, your heart pumping and your blood flowing through your veins.

The lack of physical exercise we get in this post-industrial world where machines do all the ‘work’ is a principle cause of our general poor health – obesity and high blood pressure high up on the list. Plenty of research shows there’s a clear link between lack of exercise and high blood pressure.

 

Exercise and high blood pressure – some tips

It is better to do some exercise everyday than a lot of exercise now and then. exercise and high blood pressureSet up a regular schedule – at least a half an hour a day – where you get off your sofa and move.

Your exercise regime should reflect you current state of health. Don’t overdo it at first. Start with small steps and work your way up. Even a walk around the block once a day is a good start.

I prefer to incorporate activities into my daily exercise so I get things done and feel a sense of achievement – as well as helping keep my blood pressure within acceptable ranges.

Last year I used to walk up the hill behind my house once a day to enjoy breath-taking views of the Bristol channel and the coast of Devonshire. The walk up was strenuous and really got my system working. My walk back down was relaxing in comparison and allowed my system to recuperate.

This year I’ve been concentrating on my backyard – getting all the brambles and ferns out with a pickax as well as building a drystone wall to keep the sheep out of my garden. I relegate one hour a day to this activity and it’s amazing how much I’ve achieved in such a short time.

Another sense of satisfaction is when I take my blood pressure. It is often below 120/80 these days. When you consider I was measuring 190+/115+ just a year ago, and prescription medications didn’t help, I’ve come along way.

Handgrip exercise and high blood pressure

I should add that even if you’re not able to be very active, there is now a kind of exercise you can do that will help lower your blood pressure without you even having to get off the couch.

Isometric handgrip exercises as they’re called have been well-researched in recent decades and just involve squeezing something in your hand for about 15 minutes a day. I’ve written more about it here so have a read: Handgrip exercises for lower blood pressure.

I should also point out that these are NOT a substitute for getting normal aerobic exercise – the kind which works your heart and lungs harder. Hand grip exercises affect your blood pressure in an entirely different way. However, both can help so it’s worth a shot in my opinion.

 

Other natural ways to reduce blood pressure

Of course exercise alone is not enough to reduce blood pressure. Diet and relaxation are also essential components of natural blood pressure reduction.

Diet includes supplements. Because the interest in reducing blood pressure has increased over the past few years a number of companies have been working hard to make available natural herbs and remedies that can help you get your BP down. Of course, not everybody needs them but for some stubborn blood pressure problems a natural boost in getting it down is just the ticket.

Beware however of getting conned by slick salesmen selling snake oil. Outrageous claims is often an indication of a con.

One natural supplement I have been getting positive feed back on is Alistrol. They have combined in a one-a-day pill four of the most powerful anti-hypertensive herbs.  One fellow who has been taking it for over a month now has reported a 20 point drop in his blood systolic blood pressure. It’s hard to argue with numbers.

If you’ve got “stubborn blood pressure” you might want to check it out. Click the link below:

Alistrol blood pressure supplement

Although Alistrol will help you significantly lower your blood pressure I wouldn’t consider it as a substitute for a healthy lifestyle including good diet and exercise :-).  Combine these together and you should achieve a healthy balance.

All the best,

Simon Foster

Update: Lower your blood pressure naturally (for less cost)

My partner and I have now put together a guide to help you lower your blood pressure naturally without medications.

The guide contains simple and proven strategies for lowering your blood pressure and keeping it low through easy, effective and enjoyable changes in lifestyle.

Since there are many factors which affect your blood pressure, the best way to lower your blood pressure without drugs is to apply a broad approach, and the guide covers all causes and cures with natural home-based remedies.

These include exercise (with lots of tips for being more active in your everyday life), relaxation and stress reduction, and of course the many affordable natural foods and drinks that lower blood pressure.

To keep it simple, the guide is arranged in a series of 9 easy-to-follow steps.

lower your blood pressure naturally

These progressive steps are based on the principle that positive incremental change is always best in health matters.

Each chapter will take you further along the road of greater vigour and peace of mind (and a healthy blood pressure).

Click on the link below for more information:

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally Guide

 

P.S. This guide shows you how to lower your blood pressure permanently and naturally without side-effects or complications.

Follow each step to get your blood pressure back in balance.

Choose between a wide range of delicious foods that reduce your blood pressure. Include a number of mental and physical exercises in your schedule for both relaxation and invigoration.

Following this guide will reduce, and in time, eliminate your need for blood pressure lowering medications.

This is a guide for good healthy living and will be beneficial for all – even if you don’t currently suffer from high blood pressure.

To download a sample of the guide to your computer right now click here and scroll to the bottom of the page for the download link.