Coronavirus and high blood pressure: what you can do

coronavirus and high blood pressure - what can you do?If you suffer from hypertension, you may be concerned about potential problems with coronavirus and high blood pressure. You’d be right to be concerned yet there’s no need to panic.

First we’re going to briefly discuss the risks of coronavirus with high blood pressure. Then we’re going to outline the many things you can do to improve your health and blood pressure and thus reduce your risk of coronavirus illness.

This article is meant to be positive and help you feel in control of your health so feel free to skip the next section on the risks and go straight to the practical help.

(By the way, we’re aware that ‘coronavirus’ is a term for a type of virus, however here we are using it to refer specifically to the disease COVID-19 caused by the current new coronavirus.)

Coronavirus and high blood pressure: what are the risks?

There is some evidence that having high blood pressure puts you slightly more at risk of getting coronavirus, of having worse symptoms, and of dying from it. Note the word “slightly” – !

This may not all be due to high blood pressure itself. There are a whole mixture of factors here which scientists haven’t had time to untangle yet, such as:

Age

It’s clear that older people are more at risk from coronavirus in terms of developing serious symptoms and complications and dying. This is thought to be because our immune systems weaken with age. High blood pressure also increases with age. So it may be more your age than your high blood pressure that’s increasing your risk.

Blood pressure medications

Some blood pressure medications – ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers – may increase your chance of getting infected because of their effects in the body.

Please note though that doctors and scientists still advise continuing any blood pressure medications you are on since the risk is unconfirmed and in any case, letting your blood pressure get out of control could be worse for you. As always, talk to your doctor if you have any concerns.

High blood pressure and coronavirus symptoms

Having said that, high blood pressure itself can cause specific problems if you get coronavirus. This is because, as well as damaging the lungs, coronavirus can also damage the heart (by causing inflammation of the heart muscle). Having high blood pressure means your heart is already having to pump extra hard to push blood through the arteries. So any further damage to it can be more serious.

If you also have heart disease and/or atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), then you are more at risk of severe symptoms.

NOTE: It’s important to remember that COVID-19 is a new virus so it is not yet understood fully and the science is developing all the time. If there are significant developments in the understanding of the relationship between COVID-19 and high blood pressure, then we’ll update this page.

You can read more about coronavirus and high blood pressure here:
WebMD.com – Coronavirus and high blood pressure
NPR.org – High blood pressure not seen as major independent risk for COVID-19

 

Coronavirus and high blood pressure: what can I do?

This is the most important part! If you have high blood pressure, there are many, very ordinary, things you can do to start reducing it naturally.

This will be good for your health in general, as well as your blood pressure.

These are:

  • being active and getting exercise
  • having more of the foods and drinks which are good for blood pressure and having less (or none) of the foods and drinks which are bad for blood pressure
  • staying calm and reducing your stress levels

These things are also good for your immune system.

What about supplements, you might be wondering? Is there something natural that you can take that will quickly lower your blood pressure and/or boost your immune system? There are a few and we’re going to discuss those further down the page.

 

*   *   * UPDATE 21st May 2020: The importance of Vitamin D *   *   *

There’s growing evidence that not having enough vitamin D can worsen symptoms of COVID-19 once you get it:

The growing evidence on vitamin D and Covid (The Spectator)
Vitamin D and Covid-19 disease (British Medical Journal)

In many parts of the world such as northern Europe, Canada, the northern United States, it can be difficult to make enough vitamin D via sunlight on your skin. As such, scientists now recommend taking vitamin D supplements, especially if you have been spending a lot of time indoors, such as in lockdown! However, it’s important to note that suddenly taking mega doses is unlikely to help and might not be good for you in any case. The medical advice is just to start taking vitamin D supplements at normal doses.

For example, the US Food and Nutrition Board recommends a daily intake of 600 IU (15 mcg) for children and adults, going up to 800 IU (20mcg) once you’re over 70. However, many medical researchers believe these guidelines are too conservative, especially for those dealing with chronic health problems like high blood pressure. Many argue that you’re better to aim for at least 1,000 IU (25 mcg) of vitamin D daily. This is still well within the safe upper limit set by US and UK health authorities of 4,000 IU.

vitamin D3 by CLE Holistic Health

* Special offer on vitamin D3 – 3 bottles for the price of 2 *

Taking vitamin D supplements is a good idea anyway as getting adequate vitamin D can help reduce blood pressure. It’s also extremely important for a healthy immune system.

We can recommend these vitamin D supplements by CLE Holistic Health. They are proven to be high quality. However, you can also of course buy good vitamin D supplements in your local health store (if it’s open).

 

You can read more about vitamin D and high blood pressure in our article here: Vitamin D, high blood pressure and sunshine

Also, here is the summary from the British Medical Journal listed above:

Vitamin D is essential for good health, especially bone and muscle health. Many people have low blood levels of vitamin D, especially in winter or if confined indoors, because summer sunshine is the main source of vitamin D for most people. Government vitamin D intake recommendations for the general population are 400IU (10μg) per day for the UK and 600IU (15μg) per day for the USA (800IU (20μg) per day for >70 years) and the EU. Taking a daily supplement and eating foods that provide vitamin D is particularly important for those self-isolating with limited exposure to sunlight. Vitamin D intakes greater than the upper limit of 4000IU (100μg) per day may be harmful and should be avoided unless under personal medical/clinical advice by a qualified health professional.

 

Lanham-New SA, Webb AR, Cashman KD, et al. Vitamin D and SARS-CoV-2 virus/COVID-19 disease. BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health 2020

OK, back to the rest of this article…

*   *   *

Exercise and being active

Spring is coming so it’s a good time to get out and about and be active more. Clearly, if you’re in an area where there’s a lockdown, then you may not be able to move freely. If this is the case, it’s even more important to make sure you’re still being active in whatever way you can. This could be going for a daily walk or jog in your immediate locality or even round your garden, or doing some fitness exercises or yoga as part of an online class. The point is to keep moving. It doesn’t have to be a special activity. You can even clean your house and dig your garden energetically.

Read more about exercise in our overview article here:
Lower blood pressure through exercise

See all our articles on exercise here:
Exercise articles

 

Eating and drinking for healthy blood pressure

If this could be summed up in one sentence it would be: eat more natural home-cooked foods and less processed foods. Many natural foods are good for high blood pressure, especially vegetables and some fruits, nuts and seeds, legumes/pulses, oily fish, olive oil. Lots of drinks are helpful too, such as tea (black and green) and beet(root) juice and many herbal infusions. Eating and drinking healthily doesn’t have to involve self-denial. You can still eat red meat (just not processed meats) and dairy products and drink some alcohol. Even chocolate can be good for high blood pressure, as long as you go for the good quality dark stuff (at least 70% cocoa).

Most processed foods on the other hand are pretty bad for blood pressure – and general health. This is because they tend to contain a lot of artificially added sugars and other additives as well as being high in salt. This includes processed drinks like sodas and soft drinks. Getting a lot of these is linked to a variety of disease and dysfunctions including obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

So, keep it simple. Avoid ready-made meals and fast food. Since in many countries, our restaurants and take-aways are shut anyway, it’s a good time to get into cooking from fresh natural ingredients at home. Your blood vessels and your taste buds will thank you for it in the long run.

Read more about how to eat healthily for high blood pressure in our overview article here:
High blood pressure diets

See all our articles on food and drink here:
Good foods for lower blood pressure
Drinks for lower blood pressure

Much of this website is devoted to eating well to lower your blood pressure. If there’s a specific food or drink you’re interested in, then use the search bar in the top right of this page to search this website for it.

 

Staying calm and reducing stress

As well as being linked with high blood pressure, stress suppresses your immune system. So it’s a good time to be relaxing as much as you can.

Obviously this is a stressful time for many of us in so many ways. However, there are simple, straightforward things you can do to stay calm. There are things you can do at home, such as slow breathing (discussed more below), meditation, yoga. Online classes in things like meditation and yoga are proliferating right now. Simply walking can also be very grounding and therapeutic. And actually, laughing is one of the best ways of releasing stress. So dig out any good comedy films or have a look online. Ring up friends and family and try to share the laughter as well as the love.

Read more about stress reduction in our overview article here:
Stress and hypertension

See all our articles about stress reduction here:
Stress reduction

 

Slow breathing

One of the best things you can do to relax and lower your blood pressure is practice slow breathing. This lowers your blood pressure and your heart rate and your stress levels within minutes. This effect can be short-lived. However, if you do it regularly – for example, for fifteen minutes every day – it may lower your blood pressure and stress levels more generally.

Try it. Don’t worry about specific techniques or about breathing deeply. Just concentrate on breathing slowly.

Read more about this on our sister website here (his article includes links to guided slow breathing audio tracks which can be helpful):
Quickest way to lower blood pressure naturally

 

Getting outside

the sunIt’s worth noting that getting natural daylight and sunshine is really good for your mental and physical health.

Research shows that our skin not only produces vitamin D in response to sunlight (to UVB radiation) but also serotonin and endorphins. Vitamin D is excellent for your immune system and serotonin and endorphins help boost your mood and alleviate stress. Stress suppresses the immune system and you don’t want that right now. So get as much natural daylight and sunshine as you can to keep in good spirits and good health.

Obviously, this is something that can be difficult if you’re in a severe lockdown right now. However, even if you aren’t allowed out of your home and you live in a flat or apartment, open your windows, lean out if you can, and get some sunlight on your skin and into your eyes.

It’s particularly helpful to do this first thing in the morning as it will help stabilise your body clock. Research in this area is increasingly revealing how important keeping good 24-hour rhythms is for our health – including for our immune system and blood pressure.

You can read more about sunshine, vitamin D and high blood pressure in our article here, including guidance on sunbathing safely:
Vitamin D, high blood pressure and sunshine

 

Natural supplements

vitamin D - vital for a strong immune system and it's good for your blood pressureThere are several natural supplements you can take which can help lower your blood pressure. More details are in our overview post here:
Best herbal remedies for high blood pressure

One thing which is definitely worth considering taking right now is Vitamin D supplements. Vitamin D is vital not only for healthy teeth and bones but also for our immune systems. It’s also now known that vitamin D is important for healthy blood pressure too. So right now that seems like a good idea!

You can make vitamin D naturally from sunlight but in many northern and southern countries, you cannot get enough of the right kind of sunlight (UVB radiation) for much of the year. And, if you’re in lockdown and can’t get out much, then you also may be limited in how much you can make naturally (indeed, the Scottish government is now recommending everyone take vitamin D during lockdown due to getting less sunshine).

It’s difficult to get enough vitamin D from food. You can read our vitamin D article for more advice on whether and how much vitamin D to take.

If you do take it, get a good quality supplement of vitamin D3. You can ask at your local health food store for advice. If you’re buying online, CLE Holistic Health do a good quality one (pictured). (They’re also the makers of the herbal remedy Alistrol, and have an offer on where you can get free vitamin D when you buy Alistrol).

*

What else? Well, that’s all the basics. If you want more detail on lowering your blood pressure naturally and/or if you’d like more structured guidance, then have a look at our book:

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

lower your blood pressure naturally with diet, exercise and relaxation - and garlicThis is an easy-to-follow step-by-step guide which covers everything you need to know about lowering your blood pressure naturally.

The guide goes through the many different foods and drinks you could be eating more or less of to improve your blood pressure. It looks at the different activities you could be doing to boost your circulatory health. And it outlines the various techniques and habits you can practice to lower your stress levels and generally live a more relaxed life.

PRICE REDUCTION: We’ve currently reduced the price of our book to $9.99 (about £8 or €9). This is for the pdf version. You can also buy Kindle eBook and paperback versions. Just click on the picture for details.

We wish you all the best health in these strange and difficult times. Take good care of yourself and your nearest and dearest!

 

Natural Blood Pressure Reduction Guide

How to lower your blood pressure without using drugs

There are three main ways to reduce your blood pressure permanently without taking medications. And there are three simple things you can do today to start this process.

Get all the details in our free natural blood pressure reduction guide: Start Lowering Your Blood Pressure Today

natural blood pressure reduction guide

Click here to download

This report is for everyone – whether you:
  • suffer from high blood pressure now,
  • suffer from hypertension medication side-effects,
  • want to avoid developing high blood pressure
To get the natural blood pressure reduction report click here

 

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally: Step 7

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally - The Complete 9 Step Guide

This webpage is a companion to Step 7 of our book:
Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

Step 7 discusses the various fruits, nuts and seeds which have beneficial properties for lowering blood pressure, as well as tasty ways to eat more of them. You’d be a fruitcake and a nutcase not to try this!
Click here for more information on the book: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

 

Get Fruity, Go Nutty: Nuts, seeds, and fruits, nuts and seeds that lower blood pressure

Fruit

For those of you finding your way to this page without having bought the guide, here’s of our articles on specific fruits which can help lower blood pressure:

Apples for high blood pressure

Bananas and high blood pressure

Berries for high blood pressure

 

Nutrition facts for fruit

A good source of information about fruits and health and diet in general, and information about specific fruits and nutrients: Raw Foods Diet Center – Fruits

 

How to Eat More Fruit

The UK National Health Service has useful tips on eating fruit and vegetables:
UK NHS Five a Day

The US government guidelines offer useful tips on eating fruit:
Choose my plate – fruit tips

This website is a great source of useful tips on eating more fruits and vegetables, nutrition facts etc. Fruits and Veggies – More Matters

 

Buying and storing fruit

Go organic

Pesticide loads in vegetables

The US-based Environmental Working Group (EWG)  maintains a list of the fruits and vegetables likely to contain the most pesticides and the least. This is updated each year. You can view it online and also get it as a pdf file, or an app so you can consult it when you’re out shopping:
EWG – produce and pesticides

Organic food labelling and standards

This website has great information on organic food, including labelling issues:
Organic.org

Storing Fruits

You can download a handy one-page at-a-glance guide to how best to store different kinds of fruits and vegetables:
Storing fruits and veggies

 

Nuts and Seeds

For more ideas of incorporating nuts and seeds into your diet:
nuthealth.org

This University of California website contains information on food safety regarding nuts and the history and nutritional values of popular nuts. At the bottom, there’s a further list of links for recipes including nuts:
UC Davis Nuts and Food Safety

 

Send us your ideas and suggestions

If there are other websites, resources or products you’ve found useful and you think would be useful to others, please email them to us and we’ll include them: simon [at] highbloodpressurebegone.com

 

fruits that lower blood pressure - read our guideNOTE: This page is designed to be a companion page to Step 7 of our guide, ‘Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally’. As such, it only contains supplementary resources rather than being a full discussion of all the fruits, nuts, seeds and snacks which you can use to help you lower your blood pressure.
For more information on nuts, seeds, and fruits that lower blood pressure, you can further browse this website or, of course, buy the guide..!
Click here for details: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

 

ANOTHER NOTE: We’ve supplied Amazon links to those products that may be a little trickier to find, as Amazon is popular and convenient to use. However, Amazon aren’t known to be the most ethical company (we do not endorse them ourselves) so we recommend buying your healthy products in your local shops if you can!

 

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally: Step 6

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally - The Complete 9 Step Guide

This webpage is a companion to Step 6 of our book:
Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

Step 6 discusses vegetables that lower blood pressure – which ones are the best and how to get enough of them. Legumes are excellent for blood pressure and are covered here too. To make it easy, Step 6 also gives delicious and novel meal and snack ideas involving vegetables – no, you don’t need to eat more carrot and celery sticks!
Click here for more information on the book: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

 

Veggie Heaven: Vegetables that lower blood pressure

Benefits of vegetables for blood pressure

Nutrient content of vegetables (and other foods)

For a comprehensive details on almost all vegetables, the US Department of Agriculture maintains a database which you can search to find out the nutritional content of specific foods, of all types:
USDA Food Composition Database

Antioxidants are discussed a lot but what are they really?
Antioxidants explained (Healthline.com)

 

How to Eat More Vegetables

The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has a good website that gives basic information on the main types of foods, and tips on how to eat more of them. You can also download these as pdfs (click on the ‘print’ icon right at the bottom of each page).
USDA Choose My Plate

The UK National Health Service has useful tips on eating vegetables and fruits:
UK NHS Five a Day

Even better is the website of ‘Fruits and Veggies – More Matters’: info and tips on fruits and vegetables, nutrition content, how to eat more of them, meal planning, storing…
Fruits and Veggies – More Matters

 

Best vegetables for blood pressure

Greens

Leafy greens
This is a great article on cooking leafy greens – to make them more delicious than you ever imagined:
Web MD – leafy greens

Sea vegetables / seaweed
Seaweed is an amazing source of nutrients, but if you’re not sure how to prepare and eat it, check out these articles:
Best Health Mag – Seaweed
Quick and Dirty Tips – Seaweed

Whites

Garlic

Pickling garlic

Pickling garlic gives it a mellower flavour it’s not as hot to taste and doesn’t make your breath smell. Read about how to pickle and ferment garlic:
How to pickle garlic (Tablespoon.com)
Pickled garlic (The Healthy Home Economist)

Garlic supplements
You’re best to eat real garlic, but if you really don’t want to eat it for whatever reason, then try supplements.
Kwai garlic supplements were used in many of the clinical studies into the effects of garlic.
Kwai garlic heartcare supplements (Amazon.com)

Kyolic aged garlic supplements have also been used in clinical studies are also popular – aged garlic can be more potent. They even do a formulation specifically for blood pressure:
Kyolic garlic blood pressure supplements (Amazon.com)

 

Cooking vegetables

More details on the healthiest ways to cook vegetables:
How to cook vegetables (Womens Health Mag)

Which is best – raw or cooked vegetables? To some extent, it depends on the type of vegetable.More details here:
Raw versus cooked vegetables (Food Revolution)

Raw goodness (recipes)

For more fresh salsa recipes and ideas, see this site:
All Recipes.com – salsa

For more chilled soup recipes, see this webpage:
All Recipes.com – cold summer soups

Vegetable supplements

Several companies now make dried extracts of green vegetables, often with herbs, algae and other ‘super-greens’ too. You can mix these powders into a drink to make a super-green smoothie and get a load of green nutrients all in one go.

Ora Organic make a good one: Ora Organic Greens Drink – apparently this one actually tastes good!

 

Storing vegetables

You can download a handy one-page at-a-glance guide to how best to store different kinds of fruits and vegetables:
Storing fruits and veggies

Freezing

Some vegetables need to be blanched before freezing. Recommended blanching times for specific vegetables are listed here:
Blanching times for vegetables

 

Buying vegetables

Go organic

Pesticide loads in vegetables

The US-based Environmental Working Group (EWG)  maintains a list of the fruits and vegetables likely to contain the most pesticides and the least. This is updated each year. You can view it online and also get it as a pdf file, or an app so you can consult it when you’re out shopping.
EWG – produce and pesticides

Organic food labelling and standards
This website has great information on organic food, including labelling issues.
Organic.org

 

Pulses (Legumes)

Using pulses/legumes in cooking

This article from the Mayo Clinic (University of Florida Health Center) gives a good overview of different legumes and tips on preparing and cooking them:
Mayo Clinic – beans and legumes – cooking tips

And this one has a phenomenal list of recipes for cooking with all kinds of beans and legumes. Well worth checking out:
Mayo Clinic – Bean and legume recipes

Using dried pulses/legumes

As mentioned in Step 6, using dried beans can be cheaper and tastier than using pre-cooked pulses.

To cook dried pulses you can just boil them for an hour or two (depending on the type of pulse). It’s often a good idea to soak dried pulses for a few hours before cooking as well. This shortens the eventual cooking time and gives them a better texture. Soaking them also allows the complex sugars to be leached out of the pulses. It’s these that are hard to digest and are responsible for any flatulence – details on soaking and cooking below.

One cup of dried pulses usually makes 2 – 3 cups of cooked pulses.

An advantage of dried pulses is that they can be kept in airtight containers for up to 2 years, although their nutrients do degrade a little over time.

Soaking dried pulses

Soaking softens the pulses in preparation for cooking, giving them a more even texture when cooked. The other big advantage of soaking pulses first is that it gets rid of the indigestible sugars which can cause flatulence. (You can change the soaking water a few times to be extra thorough in this regard.)

Larger pulses need to be soaked longer than small ones, but 6-12 hours is fine for most. Pulses are soaked enough once they are tender and about twice the size they were before. Lentils, split peas, black-eyed peas and mung beans don’t need to be soaked.

Rinse the pulses well in running water, picking out any that look blemished or shrivelled and discard any bits of debris you find. Place them in a large saucepan or bowl and cover with water (cold tap water) so the water’s about 3 inches higher than the pulses.

Cover and leave to stand for about 6 hours or overnight at room temperature – but don’t soak for more than 12 hours, or they might start to ferment. Drain and rinse well before cooking

You can also use a ‘quick-soak’ method which just takes an hour or two. This is useful if you’re short on time, and can be done right before cooking the meal.

Just put the pulses in the pan they’re going to be cooked in, cover with 3 inches of water, bring to the boil and boil for 2 minutes, then let them stand for an hour or two.

Cooking dried pulses

Most pulses take an hour or two to cook. Some recommend cooking in the water you soaked them in, to keep all the nutrients. However, this also retains the gas-causing sugars, so most recommend rinsing and draining the soaked pulses well, and cooking them in fresh water. People have different ways of cooking pulses, but here’s a general guide:

Place pulses in the pan and cover with water – use about three times their volume of water. You can add a little oil to reduce the amount of foam that will develop, and any herbs and spices for flavour.

Bring to the boil then reduce the heat and simmer gently, uncovered (if you boil them too hard the skins will burst). After 45 minutes, start checking them, adding more water if they get dry. Stir occasionally and cook till they are ‘fork tender’ – can be easily mashed with a fork or between your fingers.

You can add herbs and spices to the cooking water to add flavour. However salt, sugar and acidic foods, like tomatoes, vinegar or juice make uncooked pulses harden, so only add these ingredients towards the end of the cooking.

Once cooked, put them in cold water and leave until they’re cool, then drain them well and and freeze. They keep for up to 6 months in the freezer.

 

Send us your ideas and suggestions

If there are other websites, resources or products you’ve found useful and you think would be useful to others, please email them to us and we’ll include them: simon [at] highbloodpressurebegone.com

 

vegetables that lower blood pressure - read our guideNOTE: This page is designed to be a companion page to Step 6 of our guide, ‘Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally’. As such, it only contains supplementary resources rather than being a full discussion of how to use vegetables and legumes to lower your blood pressure.
For more information on vegetables that lower blood pressure, you can further browse this website or, of course, buy the guide..!
Click here for details: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

 

ANOTHER NOTE: We’ve supplied Amazon links to those products that may be a little trickier to find, as Amazon is popular and convenient to use. However, Amazon aren’t known to be the most ethical company (we do not endorse them ourselves) so we recommend buying your healthy products in your local shops if you can!

 

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally: Step 2

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally - The Complete 9 Step Guide

This webpage is a companion to Step 2 of our book:
Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

Step 2 discusses how the start your day to ensure the maximum blood pressure benefits, including what to eat and supplements which may be useful. Start the way you mean to go on!
Click here for more information on the book: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

 

Starting the Day Right: Morning remedies for high blood pressure

Supplements in general

As discussed in the Appendix (pages 10-12), the issue of supplements – whether to take them and how much – can be a tricky one! Here’s some resources which might be useful.

Dr Sarah Brewer – a UK doctor and nutritionist – articles on supplements and healthy eating (a website recommended by one of our readers)

Our post  – Supplements that help reduce high blood pressure (an overview of the issues and general debate)

Hawthorn supplements

Advocates of hawthorn recommend supplements of 100-250mg, taken three times a day. Some also recommend that hawthorn supplements contain at least 10% procyanidins – a key group of antioxidants.

Hawthorn tablets:

Nature’s Way make ‘Heart Care’ tablets with 80mg hawthorn extract from the leaf and flower and lots of procyanidins, so these could be good to start with.

Nature’s Way Hawthorn extract tablets (Amazon.com)

Nature’s Way Hawthorn extract tablets (Amazon.co.uk)

 

Make your own hawthorn tincture:

Watch our video about making your own hawthorn tincture

 

Buying Supplements

The Appendix for Step 2 gives detailed information for each key nutrient about the best form of this supplement to buy. However, it can still be tricky knowing which brand of supplements to buy as there are now so many out there!

BUYING SUPPLEMENTS IN A STORE OR ONLINE

If you want to buy in person, then the best plan is to go to your local health food shop. The staff there will be able to help and inform you, plus health food shops in general stock better quality supplements than those you can buy in the supermarket or large retail stores.

Natural News website has some informative (and opinionated) articles about buying supplements written by their ‘Health Ranger’:

Where to Buy Supplements – Natural News

You can often get good deals buying supplements online, as the companies are selling directly to you, rather than having the overheads of running a store.

Their ‘Health Ranger’ also advocates using what are called ‘whole food’ supplements as much as possible. These are concentrated forms of natural substances, containing a range of nutrients which work together, and may be more effectively used by the body than isolated vitamins and minerals supplements.

Whole food nutritional supplements – Natural News

Here are a couple of (US-based) companies which sell high quality supplements online:

Ora Organic

Quantum Wellness

 

Send us your ideas and suggestions

If there are other websites, resources or products you’ve found useful and you think would be useful to others, please email them to us and we’ll include them: simon [at] highbloodpressurebegone.com

 

morning remedies for high blood pressure - read our guideNOTE: This page is designed to be a companion page to Step 2 of our guide, ‘Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally’. As such, it only contains supplementary resources rather than being a full discussion of morning remedies for high blood pressure.
For more information on starting your day right, you can further browse this website or, of course, buy the guide..!
Click here for details: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

 

ANOTHER NOTE: We’ve supplied Amazon links to those products that may be a little trickier to find, as Amazon is popular and convenient to use. However, Amazon aren’t known to be the most ethical company (we do not endorse them ourselves) so we recommend buying your healthy products in your local shops if you can!

 

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally: General Resources

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally - The Complete 9 Step Guide

This webpage is a companion to the Introduction of our book:
Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

The introduction discusses the main causes of high blood pressure and looks at how you can start to deal with these and reduce your blood pressure using natural methods. The introduction is also a reminder of the importance of understanding your own body, and taking control of your path to better health!
Click here for more information on the book: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

 

Learn about high blood pressure and how to lower it naturally

Learn About High Blood Pressure

Understanding high blood pressure is a good start. These websites give a good overview of high blood pressure, its risk factors and causes:

Hypertension – Health Library (ACLS) – very comprehensive article on high blood pressure

High Blood Pressure – US National Institutes for Health

 

Health News and Information

These websites are reliable sources of news and research relating to health, diet, conventional and alternative medications and remedies:

Natural News – Reference Base

Diet vs Disease – well-researched articles on nutrition and health

Positive Health Wellness – comprehensive articles on health, diet, fitness, etc

 

Natural, Alternative and Complementary Remedies and Supplements and Nutrition

These websites focus specifically on alternative remedies and nutritional medicine:

The Food Medic – bridging the gap between medicine and nutrition

Dr Sarah Brewer –  Nutrional Medicine – foods, herbs and supplements

 

Healthy Eating for Lower Blood Pressure

Various national and governmental bodies have helpful websites with tips on healthy eating. These are mostly for general health, so some of their guidelines may differ slightly from recommendations in this guide, which is geared towards eating for lower blood pressure specifically.

The UK National Health Service has useful tips on healthy eating:

UK NHS Eat Well Tips

The US Department of Agriculture has a website on healthy eating guidance:

USDA Choose My Plate

Harvard Medical School has resources on nutrition, which are well-researched and which sometimes differ from the US governmental dietary advice.

Harvard Medical School – Nutrition Source

 

Cooking and Recipes

The Internet can be a confusing source of health information but an amazing source of recipes. If you want to figure out a make a healthier version of one of your favourite not-so-healthy foods, just search online: “healthy xxx recipe” etc.

Eating Well – High Blood Pressure Diet

8 Healthy Recipes for Blood Pressure

 

Buying healthy foods

Groceries and supermarkets are getting better at stocking healthier foods, although local health food stores often have a better range. Buying online can be useful for specific products and supplements that might be harder to get.

(You’ll find links for specific products on the resource page for the Step in which they’re mentioned.)

Healthy Heart Market

 

Specific Nutrient Information

For more detailed information on specific nutrients:

Harvard Medical School – Nutrition A-Z

US National Institutes for Health – Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets

Healthaliciousness – Nutrient Ranking Tool

The US Food and Drug Administration provides downloadable posters (also available just as text) outlining the nutrient content of the most common vegetables, fruits and fish:

FDA Nutrition Information for Fruits, Vegetables and Fish

For full nutrition details on all foods the US Department of Agriculture maintains a database which you can search to find out the nutritional content of specific foods, of all types:

USDA Food Nutritional Content Database

They also have a more general database you can search for information on specific nutrients, rather than specific foods:

USDA Nutrient Database

 

Medical Information – Diseases and Treatments

Professional medical websites giving comprehensive news and information on diseases and treatments:

The Mayo Clinic – Health Information

WebMD – Health News and Info

Medhelp Health Community

Harvard Medical School – Health and Medical Information

And – last but certainly not least – the alternative medical view from a doctor who’s not afraid to stand up to the medical establishment (or who’s a dodgy maverick, depending on your viewpoint…)

Dr Mercola – Natural Health Information

 

Send us your ideas and suggestions

If there are other websites, resources or products you’ve found useful and you think would be useful to others, please email them to us and we’ll include them: simon [at] highbloodpressurebegone.com

 

learn about high blood pressure - read our guideNOTE: This page is designed to be a companion page to the Introduction of our guide, ‘Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally’. As such, it only contains supplementary resources rather than being a full discussion of the ins and outs of high blood pressure.
To learn about high blood pressure and how to lower it naturally, you can further browse this website or, of course, buy the guide..!
Click here for details: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

 

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally: Step 4

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally - The Complete 9 Step Guide

This webpage is a companion to Step 4 of our book:
Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

Step 4 discusses the benefits of a Mediterranean-style diet for blood pressure, with a particular focus on choosing the healthiest grain-based foods – and the healthiest fats. Yes, not all fats are bad for us and some historical health advice is now being overturned. You don’t need to avoid all fatty food to lower your blood pressure!
Click here for more information on the book: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

 

Mediterranean Living: Foods that lower blood pressure naturally

Mediterranean Diet

There’s a good article about the Mediterranean diet here:
Positive Health Wellness – Mediterranean Diet

And if you’ve found yourself on this webpage without having bought our book, you can get an overview on our own article here:
Mediterranean diet for high blood pressure

 

DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension)

You can download copies of the DASH diet. It’s a bit regimented but there are some good recipes in the back. Note that their advice on following a low-fat diet is now outdated. Also, it’s debatable whether it’s worth specifically following a low-sodium diet (read more about the salt debate on the Step 3 webpage).

DASH Diet short version
DASH Diet Full version

 

Whole Grains

Tips on eating whole grains and list of whole grain ingredients:
Choose My Plate – Grains Tips (US government website)

Again, for those of you who don’t yet have the guide, a wee overview of whole grains in our article here:
Whole grains for high blood pressure

Whole grain recipes and baking tips

Here are some good sources of recipes using whole grain flour:
Whole Grains Council recipes

Tips on baking with whole grain flours:
Baking with whole grain flours (vegkitchen.com)
Bake with whole grains (wikihow.com)

How healthy is wheat?

There is increasing debate about the healthiness of wheat. Most of it centres around the fact that, since huge-scale agribusiness took hold, modern wheat has been intensively bred and genetically engineered so much that it has become quite different from what we used to know as ‘wheat’.

Nutritional decline of wheat

Many argue that modern wheat is significantly lower in nutritional value than the wheat being eaten even a few generations ago and that it is also now less suited to the human digestive system.

Some argue that widespread consumption of this ‘inferior’ wheat is responsible for the increase in health problems like diabetes, obesity, irritable bowel system, and digestive problems – and explains why wheat intolerance is on the rise (this is different from coeliac disease, which is an intolerance of gluten)*.

They note that this applies to whole wheat as much as refined wheat, because the wheat strain itself is so degraded that even the whole grain form of it has limited benefits.

Conversely, they argue that avoiding wheat can have substantial health benefits. There’s not yet any overall consensus though so, in the meantime, you are best to do whatever you find suits your body.
You may want to experiment with cutting down on wheat and replacing it with other grains – or even with other types of foods – to see if you notice any difference in your digestion, weight, energy levels, etc.

However, if you’re not concerned about this, or find the issue confusing, then just focus on replacing any refined grain products you eat with whole grain versions, as discussed above.

Some articles why wheat may not be so healthy now:
What’s wrong with modern wheat (grainstorm.com)
The problems with modern wheat (Mark’s Daily Apple)

How healthy are grains?

Some health experts recommend that we avoid grains completely. This is based on the idea that grains have entered the human diet relatively recently in our evolution and as such our bodies are not yet fully adapted to processing and digesting grains.

Some thus recommend following what’s called the “Paleo diet”, often dubbed the “Caveman diet” – a diet based on the kinds of food our stone age ancestors ate – fish, wild meat, eggs, fruit, roots, vegetables, nuts – a diet that’s high in protein and fibre and low in carbohydrates.

This might sound wacky or unnecessary, but there’s a growing amount of research that suggests eating grains can be related to a variety of chronic health problems, including obesity, diabetes, and various disorders of digestion.

If you’re interested, you can read more about this here:
The Paleo Diet: 15 Health Benefits – JenReviews.com
The paleo diet – short summary – webmd.com

Even some who don’t subscribe to the paleo diet hypothesis argue that the modern form of grains which are intensively bred and often genetically modified are not healthy eating. You can read more about this here:
Grains and Human Evolution
Why Grains Are Unhealthy – Mark’s Daily Apple

 

Oils and Fats

There’s an ongoing debate over the role of fat in blood pressure and health, with more and more research showing that fat and saturated fat are not bad for you in the way government health authorities have suggested (except trans fats).

This is obviously very counter-intuitive and may be hard to believe. The links below give detailed information and evidence.

Saturated fat

Clear and comprehensive summary of the state of the debate:
Looks like the medical establishment was wrong about fat (Business Insider)
Saturated fat’s role in heart disease is a myth (Medical News Today)

Why we shouldn’t have been told to eat less fat in the first place:
Links between saturated fat and health have no scientific basis (Herald Scotland)
Saturated Fat: Good or Bad? (Healthline.com)
Is Saturated Fat Okay Again? Not so Fast (Irish Times)

Plus our own brief article, with more links:
Saturated fat and high blood pressure

Many attribute the advent of the low-fat diet to the ‘Seven Countries Study’ conducted by Ancel Keys, in the 1950s and 60s. However, a re-examination of that study and others (by the True Health Commission) shows that Ancel Keys considered that total fat intake was less important than types of fat, and also that levels of LDL cholesterol in the blood were central to the effect of fat intake on heart disease – findings which most research supports today. He certainly did not advocate a low-fat diet.

The original article by the True Health Commission on the Seven Countries Study is no longer available online but you can read about it here:
True Health Initiative Releases White Paper on Seven Countries Study, Work of Ancel Keys

Cholesterol

Like saturated fat, your body needs cholesterol. However, again like saturated fat, cholesterol has been demonised a bit too much. As explained in Step 4, there are different kinds of cholesterol, which have different actions and effects in our body, with LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol being ‘bad’ for us, while HDL (high density lipoprotein) is ‘good’. So our total cholesterol levels are less significant than the ratio of different kinds of cholesterol, and other fats. Indeed, there are even different kinds of LDL cholesterol, some of which are more benign than others.

The standard view of cholesterol and high blood pressure is that lowering your LDL cholesterol levels may lower your risk of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and heart disease, and can help lower your blood pressure. This is because the more LDL cholesterol you have in your blood, the more it can get deposited on the walls of your arteries. This hardens the arteries, making them less flexible, and the heart then has to work harder to pump blood through – all of which increases your blood pressure. High blood pressure itself can also damage the walls of your arteries, making it easier for cholesterol to be deposited, and so a vicious circle can develop.

However, some doctors and researchers question this view, arguing that there’s no clear relationship between high cholesterol levels and increased risk of heart disease. Indeed, some argue that since cholesterol is an essential component of cell walls, higher cholesterol levels in those with damaged arteries may be a symptom and sign of the damage, not a cause of it. In other words, the body is sending cholesterol to repair the artery walls which have been damaged by some other process, probably chronic inflammation (which is now known to contribute to high blood pressure and many other health problems).

Read more of this side of the debate here:
High cholesterol does not cause heart disease (The Telegraph)
Does cholesterol really cause heart disease (Dr Will Cole.com)
Cholesterol isn’t the problem in heart disease: inflammation is (Mercola.com)

Omega 3 Supplements

Omega 3 fatty acid supplements are most commonly found in the form of fish oils (the omega 3s are called EPA and DHA). You can also get flax seed-based supplements (omega 3s called ALA) if you’re vegan.

Omega-3 capsules made from flax seed are cheaper than those derived from fish oil, although some argue that they’re less effective, since they contain ALA rather than DHA and EPA, which have more established health benefits.

You can buy a good quality plant-based (vegan) omega-3 supplement here. Unlike other plant-based omega-3 supplements, it’s made from algae and actually contains a good amount of DHA:
Ora Organic Omega-3

 

Fish

For information on the nutrient content of fish and shellfish (or anything else), just type it in here and search:
USDA Food Composition Database

For the best fish to eat for your health:
12 types of best fish to eat (Healthline.com)

Toxic fish

For the mercury content of fish:
Should you avoid fish because of mercury? (Healthline.com)

Endangered fish

Greenpeace has created a ‘red list’ of fish that are most endangered by overfishing and damage to their environment. It includes Atlantic salmon, halibut, and various tunas.
Greenpeace Fish Red List

 

Send us your ideas and suggestions

If there are other websites, resources or products you’ve found useful and you think would be useful to others, please email them to us and we’ll include them: simon [at] highbloodpressurebegone.com

 

foods that lower blood pressure naturally - read our guideNOTE: This page is designed to be a companion page to Step 4 of our guide, ‘Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally’. As such, it only contains supplementary resources rather than being a full discussion of Mediterranean-style eating.
For more information on foods that lower blood pressure naturally, you can further browse this website or, of course, buy the guide..!
Click here for details: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

 

ANOTHER NOTE: We’ve supplied Amazon links to those products that may be a little trickier to find, as Amazon is popular and convenient to use. However, Amazon aren’t known to be the most ethical company (we do not endorse them ourselves) so we recommend buying your healthy products in your local shops if you can!

 

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally: Step 3

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally - The Complete 9 Step Guide

This webpage is a companion to Step 3 of our book:
Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

Step 3 discusses the role of salt in high blood pressure and how to lower your blood pressure without actually giving up salt. Step 3 also looks at the effect of sunshine on blood pressure and how to ensure you’re getting its benefits. Get some sunshine in your life – and failing that, some vitamin D!
Click here for more information on the book: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

 

Back to Basics: Salt, sunshine and vitamin D

Salt

As discussed in Step 3, whether and how much salt contributes to high blood pressure is a more contentious issue than you might realise.

Some studies show that higher salt intakes are associated with higher blood pressure, while other studies don’t find these effects, or argue that they can be attributed to other concomitant factors (e.g., high sugar intake). There’s also the fact that the salt we use now (table salt and the salt added to processed foods) is far more highly refined and chemically processed than salt used in the past, and that may be part of the problem.

So is it the amount of salt, the type of salt, or other dietary factors that underlie the possible relationship between salt and high blood pressure? Here’s some interesting articles on the issue.

Overview of clinical studies into salt and health:
It’s time to end the war on salt (Scientific American)
Debunking the salt myth (Mercola.com)
What America can learn from the UK’s massive sodium experiment (The Washington Post)

On health effects of different kinds of salt:
Is salt really the villain it’s been made out to be? (Mercola.com)

And our own articles (on this website):

Hidden salt and high blood pressure
Salt and high blood pressure – dispelling the myth
Good salt, bad salt

Sea Salt

All salt is not equal, as Step 3 explains. Your best bet to find nutritious natural (unbleached!) sea salt is to look in your local health food shop. However, you can also buy good natural sea salt from Brittany, France online:

French Coarse Sea Salt – Sel de Guerande (Amazon.com)
French Coarse Sea Salt – Sel de Guerande (Amazon.co.uk)

 

Vitamin D and blood pressure regulation

As Step 3 outlines, taking a daily vitamin D supplement is a really good idea for many of us, especially if we live in northern Europe. This is not just to achieve healthy blood pressure but for many other health reasons too. Certainly in the UK, there’s more and more research showing that we’re generally deficient in vitamin D. The Scottish government now recommends everyone in Scotland take vitamin D supplements:
All Scots advised to take vitamin D

For those of you who’ve come across this webpage but haven’t yet got the guide, there’s a bit more about vitamin D on our post here:
Vitamin D and high blood pressure – and sunshine!

For more details on how much much sun exposure is needed to make vitamin D in your skin:
How do I get the vitamin D my body needs? (Vitamin D Council) [website currently down]

You can buy a good quality vitamin D supplement here:
Vitamin D3 (CLE Holistic Health)

 

Sunshine

This is an excellent article which covers the whole debate (historically and now) about the role of sunlight in human health, including information on sunlight and blood pressure:
Benefits of Sunlight: A Bright Spot for Human Health

We also have an article about the effects of sunshine on high blood pressure (and vitamin D) here:
Can sunlight cure high blood pressure?

 

Send us your ideas and suggestions

If there are other websites, resources or products you’ve found useful and you think would be useful to others, please email them to us and we’ll include them: simon [at] highbloodpressurebegone.com

 

vitamin D and blood pressure regulation - read our guideNOTE: This page is designed to be a companion page to Step 3 of our guide, ‘Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally’. As such, it only contains supplementary resources rather than being a full discussion of salt and vitamin D and blood pressure.
For more information on the effects of salt and sunshine and vitamin D on blood pressure regulation, you can further browse this website or, of course, buy the guide..!
Click here for details: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

 

ANOTHER NOTE: We’ve supplied Amazon links to those products that may be a little trickier to find, as Amazon is popular and convenient to use. However, Amazon aren’t known to be the most ethical company (we do not endorse them ourselves) so we recommend buying your healthy products in your local shops if you can!

 

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally: Step 1

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally - The Complete 9 Step Guide

This webpage is a companion to Step 1 of our book:
Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

Step 1 discusses the kinds of drinks that lower your blood pressure, as well as the kinds of drinks which raise it. In other words, which drinks you’d be good to get more of, and which drinks are definitely best avoided. You might be surprised at some of the suggestions!
Click here for more information on the book: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

 

Drink To Your Health: Drinks that lower blood pressure

Coconut Water

Coconut water is not only incredibly refreshing but also naturally full of electrolytes to help you maintain or restore a good fluid balance, which is important for healthy blood pressure. And it’s far far far better for you than sweetened soft drinks and sports drinks.

Read more here: coconut water and blood pressure

It’s becoming more popular so you can find coconut water in many supermarkets and grocery stores, and also most health food shops. Or you can buy it online:

Organic young coconut water (amazon.com)

 

Beet(root) Juice

Studies are showing that beet (or beetroot) juice is another of the drinks that lower blood pressure. It’s also much lower in sugars than fruit juice, which makes it a healthier refreshing choice. Keeping sugar consumption low is vital for lowering blood pressure.
Read more about it here: Can I lower my blood pressure with beet juice?

Beet juice isn’t mainstream yet – though its healthy properties are becoming more widely known – so you’ll probably only find it in health food stores, or you can buy online:
Organic beet juice (amazon.com)

Coffee and caffeine content of drinks

For a general overview of the caffeine content of various popular drinks:

Good informative overview of caffeine in coffee and tea (Coffee Gear Spy)
Brief overview (Healthline.com)
More comprehensive listing (University of Utah)

Specific and up-to-date caffeine content figures for drinks (and foods) from many major coffee shops, outlets and brands:
Caffeine database (Caffeineinformer.com)
Caffeine chart (Centre of Science in the Public Interest)

Tea

Drinking tea has been found to be very good for blood pressure, due to its high antioxidant content. Green tea especially is excellent, and also black tea. Herbal teas are also helpful in lowering blood pressure, especially relaxing teas to calm you down. Hibiscus tea is now also known to have blood pressure-reducing properties.

More information here:
Tea and blood pressure
Hibiscus and blood pressure

 

Tea and Herbal Tea Suppliers

The companies listed below sell a good range of teas – mostly herbal teas but also black and green teas.

As well as looking for teas containing a specific herb, you can find great blends designed for specific purposes – bedtime and sleep teas, relaxing teas, detox teas, anything you want.

Celestial Seasonings teas (amazon.com)

Heath and Heather teas (amazon.com)

Yogi teas (amazon.com)

Yogi teas sell great green, black and rooibos teas as well as doing fantastic chai teas and a lovely ginger and lemon tea.

Hibiscus Tea

Hibiscus tea can be a bit trickier to find, although it does feature as an ingredient in a variety of herbal tea blends. Some good quality teas can be bought online, or you can buy loose hibiscus to make your own tea blends, with the delicious recipe ideas in Step 1, or invent your own.

Celestial Seasonings’ Red Zinger tea contains hibiscus.

Loose dried hibiscus:

Organic dried hibiscus (amazon.com)

 

So drink up… to your health!

 

Send us your ideas and suggestions

If there are other websites, resources or products you’ve found useful and you think would be useful to others, please email them to us and we’ll include them: simon [at] highbloodpressurebegone.com

 

drinks that lower blood pressure - read our guideNOTE: This page is designed to be a companion page to Step 1 of our guide, ‘Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally’. As such, it only contains supplementary resources rather than being a full discussion of how to drink your way to lower blood pressure.
For more information on drinks that lower blood pressure, you can further browse this website or, of course, buy the guide..!
Click here for details: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

 

ANOTHER NOTE: We’ve supplied Amazon links to those products that may be a little trickier to find, as Amazon is popular and convenient to use. However, Amazon aren’t known to be the most ethical company (we do not endorse them ourselves) so we recommend buying your healthy products in your local shops if you can!

 

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally: Step 8

Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally - The Complete 9 Step Guide

This webpage is a companion to Step 8 of our book:
Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

Step 8 discusses the nefarious effects of sugar on blood pressure and the many ways in which sugar is added to foods, often without us realising. Step 8 shows you how to avoid hidden sugars and eat well, while still having sweet treats. Find the natural sweetness in life!
Click here for more information on the book: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

 

Sugar and Spice: Less sugar for lower blood pressure

Nice’n’Spicy

Herbs for lower blood pressure:

Turmeric
Turmeric has various benefits which may in turn help regulate blood pressure. Read about it in our article here:
Turmeric for lower blood pressure

Since there’s only so much turmeric you can add to your food, some nutritionists suggest taking supplements of curcumin, the key helpful ingredient in turmeric. Here’s a link to buy a good curcumin supplement online:
Curcumin supplement (Quantum Wellness Botanicals)

 

Sugar

For those of you on this webpage who haven’t bought the guide, here’s a wee introduction to the issues with sugar and blood pressure (with a few tips on how to get less sugar for lower blood pressure):
Sugar and high blood pressure

Sugar Addiction

A few articles on how addictive habitually eating sugar can be:
Sugar Addiction (Psychology Today)
Experts Agree: Sugar Might Be as Addictive as Cocaine (Healthline.com)

 

Hidden Sugar

If you’re in any doubt how much sugar is ‘hidden’ in foods you wouldn’t expect, read these:
Sugar Shockers (Web MD)

A thought-provoking article on the negative effects of added fructose:
Problems with ‘deadly’ fructose (Mercola.com)

A good article about the benefits of reducing your carbohydrates:
Reduce Grains and Sugar to Lose Weight and Improve Health (Mercola.com)

Detailed explanation of carbohydrates, their effects in the body, and the benefits of natural sources of carbohydrates rather than processed food:
What are carbohydrates? (Medical News Today)

 

Avoid hidden sugars

Barbecue sauces

You can make your own barbecue sauces with less sugar then many of the ones you can buy. Try fruit-based barbecue sauces – the fruit replaces some of the refined sugar, and you can reduce any other sugar in the recipe, and replace it with honey, maple syrup or blackstrap molasses.

A healthy recipe using apricots and links to more recipes:
Barbecue sauce recipes

Natural Sweeteners

There are many natural sweeteners you can use to replace sugar in recipes or in your drinks. Honey and maple syrup are widely available. However, here are links to buy a few others.

Blackstrap molasses
You can get this at most health food shops.
Wholesome Sweeteners – Organic Molasses (Wholesomesweet.com)(recommended by mailing list member, who promises it tastes good…)
Wholesome Sweeteners – Organic Molasses (Amazon.com)

Stevia
Stevia extract (Amazon.com)

 

Chocolate / Cocoa

Raw chocolate and raw cacao products are the best way to get the full benefits of dark chocolate – and they taste really good. More company’s are getting into raw cacao products:
Righteously Raw Chocolate (US)
The Raw Chocolate Company (UK)
Raw chocolate (Amazon.com)

 

Send us your ideas and suggestions

If there are other websites, resources or products you’ve found useful and you think would be useful to others, please email them to us and we’ll include them: simon [at] highbloodpressurebegone.com

 

less sugar for lower blood pressure - read our guideNOTE: This page is designed to be a companion page to Step 8 of our guide, ‘Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally’. As such, it only contains supplementary resources rather than being a full discussion of sugar and high blood pressure and what to do about it.
For more information on how to eat (and drink) less sugar for lower blood pressure, you can further browse this website or, of course, buy the guide..!
Click here for details: Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally – The Complete 9 Step Guide

 

ANOTHER NOTE: We’ve supplied Amazon links to those products that may be a little trickier to find, as Amazon is popular and convenient to use. However, Amazon aren’t known to be the most ethical company (we do not endorse them ourselves) so we recommend buying your healthy products in your local shops if you can!

 

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